Protecting Your Online Brand by Posting Your Perfect Press Kit

There is something crucial that most of you are missing on your websites.

In the age of social media we are all focusing on Twitter, LinkedIn, G+, and Facebook and, we’ve forgotten an important basic: Your online press kit – the asset that makes it easy for others to publicize your brand.

In many ways, your online presence is equivalent to creating your own online billboard. If you are in control of your website and your social channels, and you have a good grasp of 2-way conversation mastery, your online billboard will have the exact messaging for your tribe (potential customers and fans).

However, if this is not the case, here are some predictable scenarios:

  • You are featured on a website or in a conference program with a random photo of you that someone Googled.
  • You are introduced at an important talk by someone who is summarizing from a and Wikipedia page that focuses on all of the wrong things. (I’ve seen this happen multiple times – it’s not a good look).

You want all assets to be as much in your control as possible that you always have your best foot forward.

Follow this guide to ensure that you are in control of your brand and your image.

How To Post A Perfect Press Kit On Your Website

Editors, bloggers, conference organizers and even potential customers will deeply appreciate having seamless access to your information because they are constantly under deadline.

Here are the four assets to include:

1. YOUR BIO

Make sure your bio is easily locatable on your site and it can be easily cut-and-pasted (not in a PDF format that they can’t easily grab).

Your bio should NOT just be a “who, what, when, where, why” or a list of business accolades. Invest in having a bio written that brings out your signature story. This should be a compelling and relatable story that evokes an emotional response from the reader.

Post a long form, 250 word, 100 word and a Tweet sized bio and you have pre-delivered every possible type of bio request that may come your way (no one will ever ask you to edit your bio down again or worse, edit it for you and forget the most important parts.

TIP: Post 4 versions of your bios

  • Long Form
  • In 250 – 200 words
  • In 100 words
  • In 1 tweet

Also:  Make sure the bio can be easily cut-and-pasted!

2.  YOUR PHOTOS – MAKE THEM EASY TO FIND AND DOWNLOAD

Thumbnails are great for quick and easy loading but are detrimental for use in print (if you are a speaker or attending a conference where there is a directory, your photo may be appearing on posters, flyers and in a printed conference guide.

You should always have a few downloadable photo options on your site in at least 300 dpi / jpg format. Also post vertical and horizontal photos so editors working on a tight format won’t have to resize anything.

TIP: Create an easy-to-see link that says “click here for a hi res / low res jpg.”  That way, busy editors can get what they need easily.  When the photos are downloaded, make sure they are properly named so that editors can find them in folders and on messy desktops!

3.  INCLUDE YOUR BOOK COVER, LOGOS, OR ADDITIONAL ARTWORK

Are you an author? Do you work at a company that has a logo that might be used (or perhaps it’s your own logo and you want it used)? Include your book cover art in both hi res and lo res (jpg format).  This way, if your book, or company is being mentioned, the artwork can be easily added.

4.  INCLUDE PRESS CLIPS OR CLIENT TESTIMONIALS

What you say about you is one thing… However, what others say about you is trusted in a different way.  So, if you have press or blog posts that were written about you or pieces you were quoted in, include them on your press kit page.

TIP: Don’t link out to articles (the sites you are linking to may take them down or go dead, so make sure you include the articles archived on your site).

Another great addition is testimonials to add from clients. If you are struggling to find some, use your recommendations from LinkedIn. If you don’t have any, send an email out to a few colleagues, your old boss or a trusted influencer in your field and ask them for a testimonial.

5. INCLUDE YOUR SPEAKING TOPICS

If you are a speaker, include a list of the topics you have spoken on and give a description of each of your talks. If you have visuals of you up on a podium or teaching in front of an audience, include them in this section.

If you are not (yet) a speaker and you want to include a list of topics and themes, you are capable of speaking on these topics for people to reference.

FINAL TIP: If you can’t easily modify your website to include all of this information, you can easily set up an about.me page and include the 5 assets listed here.

Ellevate Podcast Sallie Krawcheck Interviews Ariel Hyatt on Crowdfunding

Sallie Krawcheck & Ariel Hyatt podcast

 

Join us on the Ellevate Podcast as Sallie Krawcheck interviews me about how to build your personal brand, how to effectively crowdfund, and how to sustain a healthy business career in today’s market!

Sallie is a veritable titan in the business world. Known as one of the most senior women on Wall Street, she was the president of the Global Wealth and Investment Management division at Bank of America. She is the owner and chair of Ellevate Network, a global network for professional women, and works as an advisor for several start ups. She has been featured in a wide variety of publications, ranging from Forbes to The Daily Beast, and she has contributed articles to Reuters and The Huffington Post.

It was a real honor to speak with Sallie on the Ellevate Podcast, and compare notes on life in the crazy world of business. Check it out!

CLICK HERE to listen to the podcast!

4 ‘Normal’ Challenges to Building a Strong Online Brand

The key to establishing yourself online and within your niche, is building a strong brand. Unfortunately this is far easier said than done. The process of designing, building and nurturing a new brand means you have established:

  • A unique voice
  • Consistent compelling content
  • A trustworthy reputation

The problem for most comes down to the simple fact that there is no single path to achieving any one of these things. And yet, you need to achieve them all in order for your brand to blossom.

What works for some, may not work for others.

What seems to be an obvious indicator of success for some, may be hidden for others.

A ‘brand’ is such an abstract, malleable concept and it may be difficult to know if you’re heading in the right direction. In fact, it can be down-right frustrating.

So the question becomes:

What is ‘Normal’ what it comes to building an online brand?

Here are 4 normalcies of brand building that, although may not give you the answer to the status of your brand’s growth, should give you the comfort knowing that you are not alone in your frustration and process.


Defining Your Voice Can Take A LONG Time




Whenever branding is discussed, one of the first components to be included is the idea of establishing a ‘voice’. This ‘voice’ must combine a powerful mission statement with a unique approach.

It won’t work with just one or the other.

This voice may not come to you right away. In fact, it is normal for this to take a VERY long time to fully realize.

As Malcolm Gladwell has said in his book ‘Outliers’, it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master a craft.

Once you do fully realize this voice, your focus and ability to create compelling content will be likely to become prolific.

When I created MicControl, it took me over a year’s worth of daily blogging before I found my voice.

I knew I wanted my mission to be helping musicians to advance their careers through digital marketing. But it wasn’t until I found the right approach of creating lean, skim-able, and most importantly actionable articles focused on social media marketing tactics, that my voice became truly defined.

Once this happened – the content started POURING out of me. What once took me several days of sketching, researching, drafting, re-drafting, editing and formatting, now took me only a few quick hours at MOST.


You Will Doubt Yourself… And Then You’ll Doubt Yourself Again




Doubt HAS to be the number one killer of brands. I can say from personal experience that this was the hardest obstacle to overcome. And yet, I had to work to over come my own doubt about my brand on a weekly basis (if not more often).

Because building a brand is so abstract, and can take such a long time to establish, you’ll often feel like you’re just treading water.

This is normal!

Because of this, it is important to find any successes, even if they are small, that you can not only rejoice in on a regular basis, but can use to keep you motivated:

  • A handful of Facebook ‘likes’ on a status update
  • A comment left on a blog post
  • A Re-Tweet or an inclusion in a #FF (Follow Friday) tweet

These are all successes. Use them as indicators of your growth and realize that with each small success, you’re working towards your brand-goal of creating compelling content, a unique voice and a trustworthy reputation.


There Is Often No Discernible Tipping Point




All of the small successes that are discussed above will, as Malcolm Gladwell once again famously outlined, help you to reach your ‘Tipping Point’. That is, the point in which all of these small successes finally barrel over into your one major moment… in this case it would be the moment that your brand becomes established.

And as true as this idea is, the more realistic truth is that often there is no discernible tipping point when creating a brand.

To once again use my own experience as the example, after a year or so of working day-in-and-day-out of blogging on MicControl, giving guest blog posts to others, tweeting consistently and building conversations, my personal brand as a blogger had developed.

But it wasn’t obvious to me AT ALL.

I still dealt the same lingering doubt that I felt from the beginning.

It wasn’t until one day when I woke up and realized that I had 3 separate article being published in the same day (one on my own blog and two on other highly reputable music marketing blogs) that I realized my brand was there.

This was likely months after my tipping point had come.

Although the concept of ‘the tipping point’ is certainly real, it may be more normal than you think for it to be hidden from you.


Your Commitment to Engagement Will Be Greater Than That Of Your Fans




Let’s face it, it is human nature to avoid disrupting the status quo. Very few people are willing to put themselves out on a limb, for the fear of being judged is too great. It is this simple reason that studies show people fear public speaking more than death.

Now let’s take the idea of putting yourself out on a limb, and add in the fact that through social media you’re now doing this in a VERY public forum where anyone and everyone can judge you.

If you consider this, it makes all the sense in the world why your blog posts aren’t being commented on, or your questions on Facebook aren’t being answered.

People are afraid to be the first to speak up.

Because of this, it will be absolutely normal that your commitment to engaging your fans be far greater than their commitment to engaging with you.

It is only once you establish yourself with the trustworthy reputation that any ideas, comments and responses will be heard, validated and appreciated, that your fans will start to match your commitment to engagement.

As my final self-driven example, I didn’t receive my first comment on MicControl until about 6 months into my blogging.

In each blog post, I would include a clear Call to Action at the end, asking people to engage, but was always left with nothing.

However once I started engaging with people through OTHER forums (i.e. other blogs where I had guest posted that already had an existing, engaged reader base), by responding to all comments, joining conversations that were good or bad about my ideas, and simply letting others be heard, the reputation started to build. It was this that lead to the same level of engagement I was achieving elsewhere to happen on my own blog, ultimately helping me to establish my brand a blogger.


What About Building Your Brand Has Left You Puzzled, Frustrated or Confused?




I am thankful enough to say that I was able to build a personal brand, and no doubt Ariel can say the same. Share your brand building challenges, questions or concerns in the form of a comment below and we will both weigh in based on our own personal experiences.